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Greenstein's Sour Rye

750

gram

Rye Sour

480

gms First Clear Flour

240

gms Warm Water, (80-100F)

12

gms Sea Salt

7

gms Instant Yeast

1/2

cup

Altus, (optional but recommended)

1

Tablespoon

Caraway Seeds

Cornmeal, for dusting the parchment or peel.

1

If you have a white rye sour, build it up to a volume of 4 cups or so the day before mixing the dough. If you do not have a rye sour but do have a wheat-based sourdough starter, you can easily convert it to a white rye starter by feeding it 2-3 times with white rye flour over 2-3 days.

2

In a large bowl or the bowl of an electric mixer, dissolve the yeast in the water, then add the rye sour and mix thoroughly with your hands, a spoon or, if using a mixer, with the paddle.

3

Stir the salt into the flour and add this to the bowl and mix well.

4

Dump the dough onto the lightly floured board and knead until smooth. If using a mixer, switch to the dough hook and knead at Speed 2 until the dough begins to clear the sides of the bowl (8-12 minutes). Add the Caraway Seeds about 1 minute before finished kneading. Even if using a mixer, I transfer the dough to the board and continue kneading for a couple minutes. The dough should be smooth but a bit sticky.

5

Form the dough into a ball and transfer it to a lightly oiled bowl. Cover the bowl and let it rest for 15-20 minutes.

6

Transfer the dough back to the board and divide it into two equal pieces.

7

Form each piece into a pan loaf, free-standing long loaf or boule.

8

Dust a piece of parchment paper or a baking pan liberally with cornmeal, and transfer the loaves to the parchment, keeping them at least 3 inches apart so they do not join when risen.

9

Cover the loaves and let them rise until double in size. (About 60 minutes.)

10

Pre-heat the oven to 375F with a baking stone in place optionally. Prepare your oven steaming method of choice.

11

Prepare the cornstarch glaze. Whisk 1-1/2 to 2 Tablespoons of cornstarch in ¼ cup of water. Pour this slowly into a sauce pan containing 1 cup of gently boiling water, whisking constantly. Continue cooking and stirring until slightly thickened (a few seconds, only!) and remove the pan from heat. Set it aside.

12

When the loaves are fully proofed, uncover them. Brush them with the cornstarch glaze. Score them. (3 cuts across the long axis of the loaves would be typical.) Transfer the loaves to the oven, and steam the oven.

13

After 5 minutes, remove any container with water from the oven and continue baking for 30-40 minutes more.

14

The loaves are done when the crust is very firm, the internal temperature is at least 205 degrees and the loaves give a “hollow” sound when thumped on the bottom. When they are done, leave them in the oven with the heat turned off and the door cracked open a couple of inches for another 5-10 minutes.

15

Cool completely before slicing.

Servings: 1

Yield:

Nutrition Facts

Serving size: Entire recipe (0.2 ounces).

Percent daily values based on the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) for a 2000 calorie diet.

Nutrition information calculated from recipe ingredients. 7 of the recipe's ingredients were not linked. These ingredients are not included in the recipe nutrition data.

Amount Per Serving

Calories

22.31

Calories From Fat (37%)

8.18

% Daily Value

Total Fat 0.98g

2%

Saturated Fat 0.04g

<1%

Cholesterol 0mg

0%

Sodium 1.14mg

<1%

Potassium 90.52mg

3%

Total Carbohydrates 3.34g

1%

Fiber 2.55g

10%

Sugar 0.04g

 

Protein 1.32g

3%

Tips

* Comparing Greenstein's recipe to Norm's, the former is a wetter dough and also has a higher proportion of rye sour to clear flour. Both recipes make outstanding sour rye bread. Interestingly, Greenstein says, if you want a less sour bread, use less rye sour. * Having never weighed Greenstein's ingredients before, I've never even thought about baker's percentages and the like. FYI, the rye sour is 156% of the clear flour. A rough calculation of the ratio of rye to clear flour indicates that this bread is a "50% rye."