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Chinese Sausage - Lop Chong

(Sometimes spelled lop ch'eung or lap xuong)

2250

grams

Pork butt

350

grams

Pork fat

72

grams

Sugar

50

ml

Thin soy sauce

50

ml

Chinese rice wine

35.0

grams

Salt

7

grams

Prague powder #2

3

grams

Five-spice powder

3.0

grams

White pepper

28mm casings

1

Grind meat through coarse disc (twice) then add the diced fat.

2

Mix all dry ingredients separately, in a large stainless steel bowl or pot

3

Add dry ingredients to the meat- mix well.

4

Add the liquids; blend until well mixed.

5

Hold under refrigeration for 24 hours (covered) to allow mixture to develop flavor.

6

Stuff into 28 mm sausage casings.

7

Place in pre-heated smoker at 160° F until internal temp is 140°F.

8

Allow to dry at room temperature for 5+ days or until they lose about 30% of their weight.

Servings: 16

Yield:

Nutrition Facts

Serving size: 1/16 of a recipe (6.1 ounces).

Percent daily values based on the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) for a 2000 calorie diet.

Nutrition information calculated from recipe ingredients. 3 of the recipe's ingredients were not linked. These ingredients are not included in the recipe nutrition data.

Amount Per Serving

Calories

481.48

Calories From Fat (62%)

299

% Daily Value

Total Fat 32.54g

50%

Saturated Fat 11.76g

59%

Cholesterol 150.84mg

50%

Sodium 1333.73mg

56%

Potassium 579.54mg

17%

Total Carbohydrates 5.23g

2%

Fiber 0.14g

<1%

Sugar 4.74g

 

Protein 39.45g

79%

Tips

Use Shaohsing Rice Wine; if you can't get Chinese rice wine, you can substitute dry sherry, saki or vodka--I didn't notice much difference. The soy sauce I use is "Koon Chun Thin Soy" brand from Hong Kong. If you can't get five spice powder, a passable substitute may be made by grinding the following in a "coffee mill": Szechwan peppercorns (1 tsp) [donít substitute black pepper]; Star anise (4 whole); cinnamon (1 stick); whole cloves (1/2 tsp) and whole fennel seeds (2 tsp).